Languages in the Global Liberal Arts Alliance (GLAA) Institutions



Global Liberal Arts Alliance (GLAA)

Established in 1995, Al Akhawayn University in Ifrane (AUI) is an independent, public, not-for-profit, coeducational Moroccan university committed to educating future citizen-leaders of Morocco and the world through a globally oriented, English-language, liberal-arts curriculum based on the American system.  The University enhances Morocco and engages the world through leading-edge educational and research programs, including continuing and executive education, upholds the highest academic and ethical standards, and promotes equity and social responsibility.  AUI presently has 138 faculty members from 15 different countries and 1764 students who are from Morocco and 21 other nations.  The University offers 7 Bachelor and 12 Master degree programs in its three schools: Business Administration, Humanities and Social Sciences, and Science and Engineering, and its Executive Education Center.

English and French (Language of Instruction) plus Spanish and Berber 


SPN 1301 Beginning Spanish I
SPN 1302 Beginning Spanish II
SPN 2303 Intermediate Spanish
SPN 2310 Advanced Spanish


BRB 1301 Beginning Berber I
BRB 1302 Beginning Berber II

The American College of Greece (ACG) was founded in 1875 in Smyrna, Asia Minor as a school for girls by American, Congregational, women missionaries. In 1922 the College relocated to Athens, Greece. In 1961 the College began its operation under an independent, self-perpetuating board of trustees. The College moved to its current 64-acre main campus on Mt. Hymettus overlooking Athens in 1965; a downtown campus was added in 1993. ACG has two educational divisions: PIERCE, one of Greece’s premier private high schools (800 students in grades 7-12) and DEREE, the higher education division, which offers 21 undergraduate majors in the arts and sciences and business and six masters degree programs in applied psychology, business, communication, finance, leadership, and marketing. In 1981 DEREE became the first international American college or university to be accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. Currently DEREE enrolls over 3,000 students from 56 countries, making it the largest American college or university in Europe. Thirty-three thousand ACG alumni serve in Greece and around the world in virtually every field of human endeavor.

There is no collective website for the languages/Modern Languages on ACG’s site. I found German, French, Italian, Modern Greek, Spanish, each levels 1-3 plus Business language.

The American University in Bulgaria (AUBG) is a selective and residential liberal arts institution that was established in 1991 to educate students of outstanding potential in a community of academic excellence, diversity, and respect and to prepare them for democratic and ethical leadership in serving the needs of the region and the world. AUBG is accredited both in the US and in Bulgaria. Courses are taught in English by high-quality faculty coming from four continents, experienced in teaching in a multicultural, learner-centered environment. Currently, there are about 1,100 students studying at AUBG, representing 40 countries. It offers 9 undergraduate programs in Business Administration, Computer Science, Economics, European Studies, History and Civilizations, Information Systems, Journalism and Mass Communication, Mathematics, Political Science and International Relations, and an Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA) program. The success of the University is attested by the 3,000 alumni who have already found their place in prestigious companies, started their own successful businesses, or have continued their education at renowned universities worldwide. Even Bulgaria’s newly launched university ranking system recognized the quality of education at AUBG. The University leads all Bulgarian universities in terms of the employability of its graduates and the incomes they earn, according to the system.

Modern Languages Sub-Department

The Minor in Modern Languages and Cultures at AUBG is an interdisciplinary program for students who wish to acquire linguistic, cultural and literary proficiency in one of the following languages: German, French, Spanish or Bulgarian. It can be easily combined with many disciplines offered at AUBG such as Business Administration, Economics, Journalism and Mass Communication, European Studies and Political Science and International Relations.

Founded in 1919, The American University in Cairo (AUC) is an independent and non-profit university that promotes the ideals of American liberal arts, professional education, lifelong learning, and service to Egypt and the region. The AUC has 435 faculty members and 6064 students who are mostly from Egypt and the United States. Thirty undergraduate majors, including Business Administration, Journalism & Mass Communication, Mechanical Engineering and Political Science, and twenty-seven graduate majors, including Business Administration, Political Science, Computer Science, Mass Communication and Middle East Studies, are offered at AUC.

Center for Arabic Language Instruction

No other languages are offered as majors/minors.

Founded in 1866, the American University of Beirut bases its educational philosophy, standards, and practices on the American liberal arts model of higher education. A teaching-centered research university, AUB has around 700 instructional faculty members, a student body of around 8,000 men and women, and a major medical center that serves Lebanon and the region. Professional schools include engineering, medicine, business, agriculture and food sciences, health sciences, and arts and sciences. The University encourages freedom of thought and expression and seeks to graduate men and women committed to creative and critical thinking, life-long learning, personal integrity, civic responsibility and leadership.

Arabic Language Studies


No other languages for study are offered.

The American University of Nigeria (AUN) was established in 2005 to serve as an agent of economic development, and a model of post-secondary education for Nigeria and the region, provide the skills and leadership essential to solving the continent’s pressing problems, and equip students with tools to achieve both personal and material success. The AUN presently has 72 faculty members and 1188 students from Nigeria, Ghana, the United States, Pakistan, Lebanon and Zambia. It has 15 undergraduate majors, and Computer Science, Information Systems and Software Engineering majors, housed within the School of Information Technology and Communications, are the largest programs of study.

English Literature

Minors are not listed, but judging by the Gen Ed program, French is offered.

The American University of Paris (AUP) fast approaching its 50th anniversary, was founded by an American foreign service officer who believed, after World War II, that American students required a different kind of education, one that would “de-provincialize” them, awaken them to cultural differences, and prepare them to take their places in a world held increasingly in common. Once a two-year institution for the children of expatriate Americans returning to the States via articulation agreements with Ivy League schools, AUP is today a master’s university, home to students from 100 different nationalities, and faculty from 30, fourteen different undergraduate majors and nine master’s programs. A survey of entering-class languages and dialects taken annually between 2001 and 2009 reveals that 89 different languages were represented on our campus between those dates—the figure rises to 97 if one factors in the results of a faculty language survey taken in 2002. AUP is one of the most genuinely diverse, and thereby pedagogically rich, small liberal arts institutions in the world today. The mix of ethnicities, nationalities, languages, cultures and faiths that characterize the AUP classroom makes this University a living laboratory for higher education in a globalized world. AUP’s curriculum, from the first-year learning communities through the graduate programs, takes advantage of this diversity in its approach to issues of identity and global interdependence. Indeed, in recognition of our curricular reform, we were distinguished by the AAC&U in 2003 as one of eleven leadership schools in “Liberal Education for Global Citizenship.”

Literary and Creative Studies in the Arts in French

Minor in European Languages and Cultures: English and French, one extra language, which comes from previous language learning or while at AUP, but AUP does not seem to offer any additional languages itself.

Speaking the World = English and French and students are encouraged to take external language courses for a third or 4th language.

Ashesi University College Ashesi means “beginning” in the native Ghanaian language Akan. Founded in 2002, Ashesi is a private, non-profit liberal arts college located in Ghana, West Africa. The university’s mission is to educate a new generation of ethical and entrepreneurial leaders in Africa; to cultivate within students the critical thinking skills, the concern for others and the courage it will take to transform their continent. Ashesi has 631 students from 22 countries. The school offers a four-year bachelors program grounded in a liberal core curriculum, featuring majors in Business Administration, Management Information Systems, Computer Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Computer Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. Set on 100 acres in Berekuso, overlooking Ghana’s capital city of Accra, Ashesi’s campus unites traditional Ghanaian design, modern technology and environmental best practices.

No language studies

Founded in 2005, Bratislava International School of Liberal Arts (BISLA) is the first liberal arts college in Slovakia; its undergraduate degree programs aim to convey general knowledge and develop students’ intellectual capacity. BISLA currently has 14 faculty members (5 full-time) and 55 students. It intends to remain small and international in order to maintain an environment conducive to vigorous discussions. BISLA’s core curriculum is based on political science with offerings in other social science disciplines and the humanities, namely history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, theatre and fine arts, and literature.

No language studies other than English.

Effat University, which was founded in 1999, is the living legacy of Queen Effat’s vision for education. The institution is independent, embodies Islam’s quest for knowledge, truth and enlightenment, and educates tomorrow’s leaders by providing an interdisciplinary environment that is conducive to learning and research. Effat has a diverse group of 78 faculty members and approximately 900 female students from Africa, Asia, Europe, the Middle East and North America. The University has three colleges, namely The College of Humanities and Social Sciences, The College of Business and The College of Engineering and 12 departments with Architecture, Business programs offerings, Information Systems, and English & Translation being the largest undergraduate majors. An Executive Master for Islamic Financial Management (XIFM) program started in Fall of 2010.

English and Translation Studies only

Certificate/diploma programs in German, English, French, Turkish, Arabic for non-native speakers, Spanish, Chinese, Japanese are available, outsourced to the respective languages’ cultural institutes in the country. Information is provided through the Foreign Language Center.

Franklin University Switzerland is an American International institution of higher learning, established in 1969, whose sole campus lies in the city of Lugano, near the border with Italy. Franklin is accredited by the Middles States Commission on Higher Education in the US and its academic programs are recognized by OAQ/CUS, the Swiss accrediting agencies, making it the only institution with dual US-Swiss accreditation. Franklin’s emphasis is on international education and the liberal arts, which it integrates into a wide range of majors and interdisciplinary programs in the applied sciences and the humanities, including International Management; International Relations; International Banking and Finance; Environmental Studies; International Economics; Communications and Media Studies; Visual and Communication Arts; and Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies. This global focus can also be seen in Franklin’s signature Academic Travel Program, in which each semester all students travel with faculty to destinations around the world for field work, service learning, or cultural immersion, for a total of nearly 40 such trips each academic year. In fall 2010, the College had 50 total faculty and 450 students, approximately 65% of whom from the US, 20% from Europe and 10% from the Middle East. Nearly 85% of the student body lives in college residences, which also contributes to purposeful intercultural learning. Under the auspices of Franklin’s newly formed Taylor Institute for Global Enterprise Management, in fall 2011 Franklin will launch its first Master’s program, an MSc in International Management, which has already been accepted for inclusion under Franklin’s accreditation by Middle States.

Italian and French Studies majors

Italian, French, and German Studies minors (- however, I don’t see anybody on the faculty teaching German, it could be outsourced.)

International Christian University is Japan’s first liberal arts college. It was founded in 1953 based on Christian principles, with the aim of “cultivating capable individuals, educated as internationally minded citizens, who will serve both God and people and who will contribute to lasting peace.” ICU offers a fully bilingual education in Japanese and English. The liberal arts education, provided by its undergraduate college, allows students to pursue an in-depth study in any of approximately 30 majors. At the same time, this education highlights the dynamic possibilities that can emerge as students experience areas that transcend and connect academic disciplines. The ICU tradition emphasizes interaction, and its campus offers an environment where students can interact fluently with faculty and staff outside the classroom. This campus, without parallel, was provided to ICU in the wake of the destruction from World War II, through the generous donations of a great many people who supported the university’s founding principles.

Language Education Program does not teach a foreign language but teaches how to teach it, here only English and Japanese are listed as such courses.

John Cabot University was founded in 1972 and endeavors to provide an educational experience firmly rooted in the American tradition of the liberal arts and solidly international in orientation. The academic programs are designed to fully harness the strengths of its multicultural faculty and an international student body, as well as the extraordinarily-rich culture and history of Rome and its environs. John Cabot has over 100 faculty members (13 full-time), and 360 degree-seeking and 500 visiting students from the United States, Italy and the European Union writ large. It offers 13 majors, including International Business, Communications and International Affairs.

John Cabot in Rome, Italy offers English and Italian studies but does not teach foreign languages beyond these.

Lingnan University was originally founded in Guangzhou, China in 1888, moved to Hong Kong as Lingnan College in 1967,  and became again Lingnan University in 1999.  Lingnan is committed to a quality education distinguished by the best liberal arts traditions.  There are approximately 2,600 undergraduate students–the majority living on campus–and 188 faculty memers.  Lingnan guarantees on-campus residence for all non-local students.  Liberal arts education at Lingnan University aims to instill a sense of civic duty in its students and to cultivate skills, competencies and sensibilities that enable graduates to pursue their goals in an increasingly integrated and rapidly changing social, cultural and economic environment.

Lingnan has a Department of English, of Chinese, and of Translation Studies, but teaches no additional foreign languages.

Digital Pedagogy


Rethinking Pedagogy for a Digital Age: Designing for 21st Century Learning 

Allen, Wendy W. (2014, January). “Developing Cultural Proficiency.” The Language Educator Magazine. ACTFL. Retrieved from:

Bennett, Brian. (2012, May). Redesigning Learning in a Flipped Classroom.

Byrne, Richard. Free Technology for Teachers: A Comparison of Blogging Platforms

Edudemic: The 10 Best Web Tools for Flipped Classrooms; The Teacher’s Guide to Flipped Classrooms

Edutopia: Flipped Classroom

Flipped Learning Network

Gonzalez, Jennifer. Modifying the Flipped Classroom: The In-Class Version

Kirch, Crystal. Flipping with Kirch.

Transparent Language. Flip Your Language Classroom the Right Way.


Creating a Free WordPress Blog – Tutorial for Beginners

The Flipped Class: Overcoming Common Hurdles

How to Set Up a Blog from Scratch Using

General Best Practices 

How to not be a Helicopter Professor and why that matters for us and our students.

Hands-on digital exercises: 

Speaking Proficiency

Writing Proficiency

Reading Proficiency

Listening Proficiency

Intercultural Learning

Digital Tools:

Denison U Library Collection

Zoom Video-Conferencing Tool

Google+ Hangouts 










Enhancing Pronunciation and Intonation

Students can video-record themselves on Zoom (here reading a poem), upload video to Dropbox and share link with instructor for review.

Reading, recording, sharing a poem with Zoom (See “Donnerstag”)

Screen Shot 2015-10-26 at 1.30.49 PMScreen Shot 2015-10-26 at 1.29.03 PM

Video Recording of Instructor Modeling Reading


Global Partner Student Introductions

Saddan Genao Lizardo, an international Denison student from the Dominican Republic, is introduced by AUBG student Uje from Mongolia. Uje created a PPT presentation for her intermediate German class with Dr. Stantcheva/AUBG.

Saddan Genao Lizardo complete PPT.

Saddan at Denison and his home



Thoughts on Suicide

This page is dedicated to the memory of Wendell Jackson, “a young, bright student, a remarkable Denisonian with a wonderful energy about him,” and who “had an amazing ability to bring people together. He walked across this campus creating friendships with a huge spectrum of people. He saw differences as an opportunity to be challenged and to learn” (President Weinberg).

He left us too soon.  But it’s never too late to learn about suicidal thinking and save lives.

Thoughts on Suicide


Suicide is a complex malaise. Sociologists have shown that suicide rates vary with factors like war and unemployment; psychoanalysts argue that it is rage toward a loved one that is directed inward; psychiatrists see it as a biochemical imbalance. No one approach holds the answer: It’s all that and much more …”

Edwin Shneidman, Psychache

“Each way to suicide is its own: intensely private, unknowable, and terrible. Suicide will have seemed to its perpetrator the last and best of bad possibilities, and any attempt by the living to chart this final terrain of life can be only a sketch, maddeningly incomplete.”

Kay Redfield Jamison, Night Falls Fast: Understanding Suicide       


Novelist William Styron in Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness recounts his struggle with suicidal depression capturing vividly the heavy, inescapable pain that can lead to suicide: “What I had begun to discover is that, mysteriously and in ways that are totally remote from normal experience, the gray drizzle of horror induced by depression takes on the quality of physical pain. But it is not an immediately identifiable pain, like that of a broken limb. It may be more accurate to say that despair, owing to some evil trick played upon the sick brain by the inhabiting psyche, comes to resemble the diabolical discomfort of being imprisoned in a fiercely overheated room. And because no breeze stirs this cauldron, because there is no escape from this smothering confinement, it is entirely natural that the victim begins to think ceaselessly of oblivion.”


Further recommended reading41965YQ0J5L._SX335_BO1,204,203,200_

Comprehending Suicide by Edwin Shneidman

November of the Soul: The Enigma of Suicide by George Howe Holt 

New York Times Article on Suicide

Collection of Psychoanalytic Sites 

The Suicidal Mind by Edwin Shneidman and The 10 Commonalities in Suicide

The Bell Jar and Poems by Sylvia Plathimages-5

The Sorrows of Young Werther by J.W. v. Goethe


Crisis Hotline Director Alan Ross Explains How To Help Someone With Suicidal Thoughts

Learning about suicide and suicide prevention

National Suicide Prevention Week – September 7 – 13, 2015

Suicide and Depression Student Guidebook

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255)

National 24/7 suicide hotline: 1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433)

Columbus, Ohio Suicide hotline: (614) 221-5445

Military Veterans Suicide Hotline: 1-800-273-TALK (Press 1)

Suicide Hotline in Spanish: 1-800-273-TALK (Press 2)

LGBT Youth Suicide Hotline: 1-866-4-U-TREVOR


Image Copyright by Christian Faur

WORLD SUICIDE PREVENTION DAY is September 10, 2015!!

International Association for Suicide Prevention 

Check out Tweets Hashtag  and !


Featured Image -- 1490

Is Social Media Dying in Germany?

Originally posted on BusinessWired - Business Wire Blog:

By Seval Dogan (Marketing Specialist – D/A/CH Region) and Kai Prager (Senior Media Relations Specialist – Europe)

There are more and more discussions occurring in Germany that social media is losing its popularity. A recent article published by emarketer even argues that Facebook is dying.

This claim was based on a survey conducted by Faktenkontor, which found that the percentage of social media users visiting sites like Twitter, Xing, Facebook and so on had dropped over the past year. The survey was widely distributed in the German and European markets and cited heavily by online media, including sites like and The assertion eventually triggered a viral-like reaction on the internet with thousands of social media shares. It seems the article convinced plenty of users, confirming what some already suspected, that the future of social media and Facebook was gloomy.

Beach imageIt is our impression, however, that this…

View original 1,139 more words

CLAC @ Denison Interest Group (DIG)

CLAC Meetings with Interested Denison Colleagues (Faculty and Staff)

May 13 and 14, 2015 in the Foresman Lounge, Fellows Hall

clacmtg3We had two very productive and engaged meetings discussing first impressions of the CLAC conference and  further materials and what CLAC at Denison might look  like. Gabriele then gave an overview of the various existing CLAC models and its hybrid models, what it takes to get buy- in from faculty, staff, and the administration, the potential for increased professional development, how to tab into funding sources, and where to learn more about pedagogies and approaches to internationalizing one’s courses and the campus curriculum as a whole.

We also discussed how to more effectively integrate international students at Denison and make their study-abroad experience richer and more culturally relevant and likewise how to enhance and give more depth to the study-abroad experience of our Denison students.

clacmtg8Representatives from various departments and offices across campus were present and collaboratively discussed ideas and made suggestions from their specific point of view. Colleagues from International Student Services, the Registrar, the Library, from the Social Sciences, Humanities, Arts, and Sciences were present.

One distinct feature of CLAC made itself apparent immediately in both meetings: participants in the CLAC enterprise feel welcome and appreciated for the fact that they are multicultural and multilingual. CLAC provides a structure for collaboration and a sense of belonging, where one’s skills and background adds something specifically positive to the campus culture and student learning.

Professional development is another important aspect of CLAC. By collaborating with faculty members from another field, if not another discipline, faculty engage with new ideas, gain new perspectives, see their own area of research and inquiry from a different perspective. There is much pedagogical exchange as well and in that sense faculty mentoring is organically integrated.

CLAC has a subversive element to it: it does break up the professor = authority model for the sake of engaging with students in a productive learning environment where everybody benefits from the knowledge of each other. Students may know a language and bring in knowledge and experiences from a culture that the instructor is not familiar with or knows little, if nothing, about. It empowers students and integrates them more holistically in a learning community that produces life-long learning.

In order for CLAC to happen on our campus, we need a structure. We discussed the various models existing in the many different types of institutions that have successfully built and maintained a CLAC (FLAC, C-LAC, GAC, LAC, LxC) program. It seems that a Denison a hybrid model of some of these is a good solution. From CLAC-light to CLAC-integrated to CLAC-full-immersion, all are possible in some way. However there needs to be an incentive and reward system. It cannot be that faculty are asked to take on an extra, additional workload – such as for example the many directed studies units some of us teach on a regular basis to compensate for special student interest that cannot be accommodated otherwise or chronically under-enrolled upper level courses. In the long run, if it were to take off at all, such a model is not sustainable. Different models exist on different campuses from extra pay for additional units of instruction, to stipends for course development, to banking a certain amount of units to cash them in later for a course release, or a combination thereof.

CLAC fits in beautifully with the goals of GLCA’s Global Liberal Arts Alliance, specifically with the global course connections. At Denison, we already have a couple of courses connected with our partner universities, such as for example with the American University in Bulgaria, where two intermediate level German courses have been team-taught in four consecutive semesters. CLAC can support these efforts in a most meaningful and productive way.

We now have a Center for Learning and Teaching directed by a very invested and supportive colleague, Frank Hassebrock, who has already offered to support CLAC initiatives in any way he can, such a brown bag get-togethers to further explore and discuss ideas and even some funds to make some of these innovative ideas happen in our classrooms. (The new L&T Center will have a physical home in Doane library.)

There are funds available on the federal level for such initiatives as CLAC. There are also a number of private sponsors and foundations that support the internationalization of one’s campus. This requires research, time and much investment for a colleague to pursue. Just like a successful CLAC program needs careful planning, organizing, administering, and bridge-building between the various stakeholders on campus carried out by a designated colleague.

Denison already is a member of the CLAC consortium and has at least 2 active members in that organization at this point. The fact that we hosted a conference for CLAC so early on in the membership period, has opened doors to provide us with advice and support from the very experienced and seasoned members of the consortium in this planning process. Chances are very good that we will pursue CLAC in a well-informed and fruitful way. Most importantly, however, we have enthusiastic colleagues who embrace the potential of these opportunities in their teaching, learning and scholarship. In fact, many have been practicing some form of CLAC already with their students over the years and only need acknowledgement to take their ideas and practices to the next level.

  1. Introductions and Comments on why CLAC is of interest

Gabriele Dillmann, Modern Languages – German, CLAC @ DU

  • started bringing CLAC to Denison with GLCA’s New Directions Exploration Grant and GLCA’s New Directions Initiative Grant (2011/2012) (Thank you, GLCA!!)
  • combined CLAC with COIL via Globally Connected Courses Initiative
  • joined CLAC Consortium in 2010
  • Denison became member of CLAC consortium in 2012
  • hosted 9th annual CLAC conference at Denison in April 2015
  • member of the CLAC 2016 planning group and CLAC Consortium Repository group

Katy Crossley-Frolick, Political Science and International Studies

  • regrets that students don’t make use of their language skills in courses, wishes to more intentionally make that happen

Sue Davis, Political Science and Interim Off-Campus-Studies Director

  • speaks Russian but cannot integrate Russian into her classroom
  • wishes to internationalize curriculum
  • finds that there are pockets of internationalization efforts but no consolidated structure

Micaela Vivero, Art Studio, Sculpture

  • speaks German, Spanish, English
  • team-taught course with Spanish faculty member “Introduction to Sculpture” in the Spanish language as a parallel course; same students took Spanish language course with Spanish faculty member
  • “One of my most rewarding experience at Denison.”
  • mainly Spanish majors enrolled, understood art from a cultural perspective
  • Issues to address in a follow-up iteration would be: what requirement/s would this course fulfill? How do we avoid depleting courses offered by Spanish faculty? Where would such a course reside?

Fran Lopez, Spanish

  • students learning how their field of study is important in another archive; e.g. complexity theory founded by 2 Chilean scholars; students know work in translation only, but “translation is a traitor,” and not being aware of an ideas origins promotes ethno-centric or US-centric thinking;
  • in a CLAC model, students and professors can learn from each other

Taku Suzuki, International Studies, East Asian Studies

  • attended CLAC conference and saw a lot of potential but also has concerns
  • most interesting: engage more international students more intentionally
  • students as resources in courses
  • Returning students could/should meet intern. students more intentionally
  • OCS transformative, needs reflection and discussion, best moment is upon return
  • Member of Global Studies Refinement Group at DU

Marilyn Andrew, International Student Services

  • International students are eager to make friends with US students, but find it difficult
  • Sending countries are not necessarily receiving countries
  • Diversity lens AND global lens
  • Problem: international students could not take financial aid with them, now international students can take their need-based funds abroad
  • International students as resources, they are living the off-campus study experience, resource to departing students
  • Domestic minorities also a cultural entity for diversity and internationalization
  • Host families play significant role
  • Expand study-abroad experience to a full year rather than a semester, i.e. often only 3 months of abroad experience
  • Costs would not be significant enough to NOT offer that option financially in comparison to benefit
  • Concern about OCS experience being too “American,” not enough immersion in host country
  • Concerns from other colleagues: how to have enough students in upper level modern languages courses if language students are gone for a whole year? Revise major? Many science majors already find it almost impossible to go abroad as is. Changes in curriculum? Often incoming/new chairs don’t allow for the same credit transfers into the major and minor as previous chair. Revisit transfer policy?
  • Importance and benefits of faculty site-visits

Emily Henson, Center for Cross-Cultural Engagement

  • Buddy system supports mixing of US students and intern. students
  • Online matching
  • Integrate intern. students in courses across campus
  • DU has many students who are sons and daughters of recent immigrants, rather than embracing their background, they hide it in order to fit in – Denison a culture of fitting in?
  • Host families to bring intern. and US students together as a way to connect them to each other further

Eva Revesz, German and Writing Across Curriculum

  • very impressed by ideas that came from CLAC conference, in particular Binghamton’s three-tiered course sequence: pre-departure, projects during study-abroad, returning students
  • could see offer such a course for returning students and current international students with a writing overlay to explore and articulate their experiences
  • such a course promotes intercultural learning and proficiency
  • in conjunction with potentially new Global Commerce Major or IS Major

Quentin Duroy, Economics Department

  • member of Global Studies Refinement Group at Denison University
  • looking for ways to increase global awareness on campus
  • sees great importance of bi- or multilingualism as a norm to become effective global citizens
  • language and culture inseparable

Sohrab Behdad, Economics Department

  • has had a keen interest in internationalizing our curriculum for years
  • began current Global Studies meetings over 17 years ago
  • discussed with then president Michelle Myers the need to increase course offerings with international character

Hanada Al-Masri, Arabic

  • sees much merit in CLAC approach for a more international curriculum
  • sees many connections between CLAC and global initiatives
  • ideas expanding everywhere
  • challenge for Arabic: length of language studies required before proficiency increases sufficiently
  • primary base for content courses are heritage and returning OCS Arabic speakers that might be cross-listed with Political Science, Gender Studies, Economics

Cheryl McFarren, Theatre

  • language: French, taught French in middle school and high school for some years
  • teaching theatre is always about teaching culture on some level
  • attended CLAC conference and walked away full of ideas, but will there be enough time and energy to make these ideas happen?
  • Comment: we need to not work more but more effectively and economically with the time and energy we have

Frank Hassebrock, Psychology, Faculty Fellow for Learning and Teaching, Teaching and Learning Center (part-time)

  • his job in his new role of leading the L&T Center is to listen and help with faculty programming and collaborate on projects
  • there will be brown bag meetings to exchange ideas
  • some funds will be available through he center
  • the Center now has an actual physical location on the Atrium level of Doane Library with offices, potentially an AAA (shared) and a resources room
  • Frank’s current office is in Knapp 410-H

Diana Mafe, English

  • field_post-colonial literature
  • multi-lingual (Dutch, English, French) and culturally diverse: lived in Nigeria, Canada, US
  • is interested in diversity, inter- and transculturalism, internationalization of the curriculum and exploring CLAC as one of these means towards those interests

Moriana Garcia, Library

  • is interested in CLAC for personal and professional reasons
  • always searching for opportunities to support DU faculty as a librarian with resources
  • likes to be in dialogue with faculty to know and understand what it is that they need
  • sees great importance of living in and with different cultures and the role language plays in that context
  • languages Spanish, Portuguese, English

Arnie Joseph, French, emeritus

  • finds CLAC compelling for its potential “to put the human back into the humanities”
  • humanities have been sucked out of the curriculum over the years
  • interest in human contact expressed in languages and culture seems to be coming back
  • cheering on from side-lines!
  • attended CLAC conference and felt that too many administrators were speaking about structures and systems, when he wanted to hear more about what actually happens in the classroom
  • New course idea: From Adolescence to Alzheimer’s :)

Louis Villanuevo, Economics

  • invited to this meeting by a colleague in Econ who thought that this group may be very much in line with his interests (Sohrab Behdad)
  • teaches Latin-American economic development
  • is multi-lingual: Spanish, English, French
  • sees potential in CLAC to enrich his courses with an even deeper layer of intercultural engagement

Isabelle Choquet, French

  • research interest in the Caribbean
  • is always looking for creative ideas for her courses and to keep her teaching fresh and up-to-date
  • wants to offer students meaningful venues to explore and learn
  • is collaborative by nature and seeks collaborations
  • loved brainstorming atmosphere of CLAC conference
  • wants to engage further

Yadi Collins, Registrar

  • is multilingual and multicultural herself (Turkish, German, English)
  • as administrator has professional interest in new and innovative ideas that might benefit the campus
  • sees herself in the role to make creative ideas by faculty happen from the mechanical side of things
  • there are more than one format effectively addressing programs and ideas
  • sees much benefit in internationalizing the campus across the disciplines
  • CLAC promotes collaboration
  • Can-do personality type! J

Wendy Wilson, Theatre

  • speaks French besides her native tongue
  • is interested in what makes man tick – finds this in studying and exploring multi-ethnic films and art, informs her work in theatre
  • in acting international students, POSSE students, otherwise diverse students, have to overcome different challenges than some other students, everybody has to learn how to work together and is only possible by understanding differences
  • introduced Spanish language in one of the theatre pieces with remarkable results, wishes to do more such projects
  • On the potential subversive aspects of CLAC “The in-between space, the liminal space, is where you can learn – giving up authority takes you there.”

Follow-up from colleagues:

Emily Henson, Program Coordinator, Center for Cross-Cultural Engagement (CCCE)

Thanks again for inviting us and getting everyone together, it was very informative! As a staff member I am always trying to find a way to connect programs/events with faculty and working for the Center for Cross-Cultural Engagement as a program coordinator it makes sense to work together sometimes.

During the meeting you mentioned working more effectively with what we have instead of creating more work for us as we begin this process of becoming a more internationalized as an institution. One suggestion I have is working with the Cross-Cultural Communities (C3), they are our multi-cultural student organizations on campus. They have brought many great speakers, performers, artists, etc to campus, but often faculty do not know about their great event until last minute and and they may not know of great events faculty may organize that connects to their organizations. I work pretty closely with may of these organizations and during my time here I’ve seen many missed opportunities to collaborate. As I’ve talked to students, many of them would like to work with faculty but may not know how or who to reach out to, they also do not plan ahead which makes it difficult. In my experience if faculty or staff reach out to student organizations they are more than willing to collaborate and work together.

One example this year was the Human Right’s Film Festival, I worked with Isis to connect student organizations with film showing that may relate to them. We gave the student orgs an opportunity to facilitate a discussion after each film in conjunction with faculty. Not only was there a higher turnout but the students were able to make connections with faculty that they might not have otherwise.

Another example was an event Hanada, the Middle Eastern Cultural Organization and I planned–we took students to a middle eastern restaurant and a concert called HeartBeat.

I believe that by being more strategic this is a great way to learn about the world without even stepping off-campus. This is also something that can be implemented quicker than bigger projects (such as helping students study off-campus for a year). It’s a little difficult to explain this over email, so if you’d like to talk about this more please let me know. I’m here through May and am really passionate about this.

Quentin Duroy, Economics

Thank you for organizing the meeting. I am very excited about the ‘more global’ dimension of the current curricular discourse on campus. CLAC is very intriguing. I have been teaching a course on social and economic policies in the EU off and on over the past 7 years. Next year I will submit a proposal to AAC to make it part of the Econ curriculum. Once it is established as a regular econ class, I will look into ways to make it CLAC friendly and maybe eventually add French and German units… Vielen Dank for sharing your knowledge and experience!

Laura Russell, Communication

Thank you so much for keeping me in the loop with CLAC. While I am sorry that I will not be able to attend the sessions next week, I really appreciate your involvement in organizing these conversations among colleagues. I hope that in the future I will be able to be involved in further developments. This program probes such valuable intersections for our liberal arts goals.

Advice from seasoned CLAC practitioners on implementing CLAC at Denison: 

“What wonderful news! Denison is poised to become a national CLAC leader.

Three suggestions for CLAC at Denison:

1. Denison should adopt CLAC involvement as a “welcome ingredient” in all faculty hiring, all tenure and promotion cases, and all salary-increase justifications. Not required, but welcome; and therefore always to be looked for and never to be denigrated. This change should come not from the president, though his support would of course be essential, but rather from whatever faculty governance body or bodies deal with these things, including the faculty senate, P&T committee, and even individual departments.

2. CLAC should infuse itself throughout Denison’s curriculum. Non-language faculty should be equal or even greater in number in designing and implementing CLAC. Every academic program should be involved. Links to study abroad and internationalization-at-home should be included in every possible way.  The ubiquitous meaningful use of languages other than English and inclusion of perspectives from all cultures should become a standard expectation for all faculty and students.

3. Denison’s GLCA network should be employed to maximize and expand your CLAC options. Faculty and students at your partner colleges abroad possess a degree of bilinguality to which Denison might well aspire to equal.”

Expand Student International Experiences Without Leaving Your Campus

H. Stephen Straight, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and of Linguistics, and Founding Director of the Languages Across the Curriculum (LxC) Program, Binghamton University

“1). There’s no 1 right way to establish CLAC.

2). Look to your institution’s champion areas for roots (ours turned out to be the Career Development Center, specific faculty, administrators, staff across campus, and the Linguistics Program and the Anthropology Department, and the Libraries)”

Webinar “What Does an Internationalized Curriculum Look Like? The Promise of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum” (available at Denison shortly through the L&T Center)

Dr. Suronda Gonzalez, Director, Languages Across the Curriculum (LxC), Global Studies Minor (GSM), Chair, CLAC Consortium

“As Suronda said, one of the great things about CLAC is its flexibility.  I assume Denison is much like Juniata in the need to engage as many stakeholders as possible in the process.  Through our international education advisory groups, we looked at what we were already doing that was CLAC-like (we had many students who were double-majoring in foreign languages and other fields, and then studying abroad in the second field, but in the target language) and focused on those areas first (for example, chemistry students who studied in Marburg).  Then we began applying for grants to connect faculty in the targeted fields with international partners in the targeted languages to integrate CLAC more intentionally into the programs.”

Dr. Jenifer Cushman, Campus Dean / Associate Professor of German, Ohio University Zanesville, President of the Association of International Education Administrators/

“I am working on the administrators’ and faculty members’ buy-in on my campus. I worked closely with each faculty members and designed their own CLAC projects specific to their courses. I also found that preparing students for the coming CLAC projects is very important. So I usually have a mini-workshop for the students at the beginning of the projects.” 

JY Zhou, Ed.D., Internationalization Specialist, School of Education, Stockton University, Globalization Lecture Series: to Globalize the Curriculum: